Steroid shots for plantar fasciitis

Interesting that you don’t mention what I find to be the #1 cause of plantar fascitis. It is trigger points in the soleus muscle which cannot be stretched in the same manner that is used to stretch the other calf muscle (the gastrocnemius). You can work the foot and heeel all day long and not resolve the problem until you get rid of the triggr points in the soleus and learn how to stretch it properly.
I am a massage therapist and you don’t even mention seeing this group of professionals who can be very helpful in working with someone. Massage the calf; do NOT massage the foot. Once you have gotten rid of the trigger points and gotten the calf muscles in good shape you can then massage the foot…..but chances are you wont’ need to. It will have become a non-issue.

How often cortisone injections are given varies based on the reason for the injection. This is determined on a case-by-case basis by the health care practitioner. If a single cortisone injection is curative, then further injections are unnecessary. Sometimes, a series of injections might be necessary; for example, cortisone injections for a trigger finger may be given every three weeks, to a maximum of three times in one affected finger. In other instances, such as knee osteoarthritis, a second cortisone injection may be given approximately three months after the first injection, but the injections are not generally continued on a regular basis.

Lolol..well if "misery loves company" can be helpful then I'm glad but it usually isn't such a great thing. However, it does help to vent and talk to others who know you aren't exaggerating your pain. I wish we could help to heal each other...then I would really be thankful. Maybe we will huh? We will keep each other informed and hopefully we can find ways to ease the pain. My Dr won't give pain meds!!! I think I should own stock in a the Makers of Advil bc that's what I take all the time...it doesn't take the pain but it does seem to round the pointed corners sometimes...just barely takes the edge off. We will talk more my friend.....

Patients often needlessly worry about a so-called “heel spur”.  It is not unusual for a projection of bone to occur along the top surface of the plantar fascia, parallel to the ground.  However, the “spur” is rarely, if ever, the source of the patient’s pain.  Patients with heel pain only demonstrate a “spur” on x-rays about 60% of the time.  Patients that have never had heel pain can demonstrate the same “spur” on x-rays about 40% of the time.  It is simply wrong to think that the pain is caused by walking on a downwardly protruding “spur” (even though it might feel that way).  The bottom line is that the presence or absence of a “spur” does not influence the selection of treatment or the result of the treatment.

“If a person comes in with heel pain, and they say that it’s on the milder scale, I tend to hold off on the injection at an initial visit. I would instruct them to do stretching, icing, modify activities and shoewear, as well as avoid walking barefoot on hard surfaces. Occasionally I’ll prescribe anti-inflammatory medications by mouth,” MacGill said. “If a patient comes in with more severe pain, in the absence of any kind of trauma, and I don’t suspect that there’s any kind of rupture of the plantar fascia, then I’m more likely to give them the cortisone injection.”

Steroid shots for plantar fasciitis

steroid shots for plantar fasciitis

Patients often needlessly worry about a so-called “heel spur”.  It is not unusual for a projection of bone to occur along the top surface of the plantar fascia, parallel to the ground.  However, the “spur” is rarely, if ever, the source of the patient’s pain.  Patients with heel pain only demonstrate a “spur” on x-rays about 60% of the time.  Patients that have never had heel pain can demonstrate the same “spur” on x-rays about 40% of the time.  It is simply wrong to think that the pain is caused by walking on a downwardly protruding “spur” (even though it might feel that way).  The bottom line is that the presence or absence of a “spur” does not influence the selection of treatment or the result of the treatment.

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